Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Tooth Decay. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Tooth Decay. Mostrar todas las entradas

3/31/2020

ORAL HYGIENE : How to prevent tooth decay in children?

Oral Hygiene

Tooth decay, also known as dental cavities or caries, is the most common dental problem amongst children.

It can cause painful holes (cavities) in your teeth.

Cavities usually need to be drilled and then filled to keep the tooth decay from getting worse.

But doing certain things can help to prevent the need for treatment in the first place.

The most effective way to prevent tooth decay is by regularly brushing your teeth and strengthening them with fluoride.

Sticking to a healthy diet and not eating too much candy or sweets is also good for your teeth. Last but not least, dental check-ups can help detect and treat tooth decay early on.

Read Also: What is Early Childhood Caries ?

Tooth decay is mainly caused by bacteria in the plaque that coats your teeth, and by too much sugar in your diet.

So limiting your consumption of sugary foods, drinks, candies and gum is one way to prevent tooth decay.

Eating sweet things every once in a while is perfectly fine, though, as long as you still take good care of your teeth.


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3/23/2020

TOOTH DECAY : Difference between Early Childhood Caries & Rampant Caries

Oral Health

Dental caries has a multifactorial etiology.

It is developed upon the presence of dental biofilm, which is responsible for mediating the demineralization of dental tissues: enamel and dentin.

There is need of interaction among three factors so that caries occur: cariogenic microorganisms (Streptococcus mutans), fermentable substrate (such as saccharose) and a vulnerable host.


The interaction among these factors during a period of time promotes the development of caries, which begins with the appearance of opaque white spots, without cavity, on dental surface, resulting from demineralization of tooth enamel.

ECC can begin early in life, progresses rapidly in those who are at high risk, and often goes untreated.

Its consequences can affect the immediate and long-term quality of life of the child's family and can have significant social and economic consequences beyond the immediate family as well.

Read Also: TOOTH DECAY: How to prevent baby bottle tooth decay

ECC can be a particularly virulent form of caries, beginning soon after dental eruption, developing on smooth surfaces, progressing rapidly, and having a lasting detrimental impact on the dentition.

Children experiencing caries as infants or toddlers have a much greater probability of subsequent caries in both the primary and permanent dentitions.


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3/20/2020

CLINICAL CASE : 26 Month old child with severe child hood caries

Dental Caries

Dental caries (decay) is an international public health challenge, especially amongst young children.

Early childhood caries (ECC) is a serious public health problem in both developing and industrialized countries.

ECC can begin early in life, progresses rapidly in those who are at high risk, and often goes untreated.


Its consequences can affect the immediate and long-term quality of life of the child's family and can have significant social and economic consequences beyond the immediate family as well.

ECC can be a particularly virulent form of caries, beginning soon after dental eruption, developing on smooth surfaces, progressing rapidly, and having a lasting detrimental impact on the dentition.

Read Also: ORAL PATHOLOGY : Residual Neonatal Teeth: A Case Report




Youtube / Ahmed ElNassry
Image : NZ Herald

3/12/2020

DENTAL HEALTH : Teaching Kids About the Causes & Effects of Cavities

Dental Caries

Teaching kids about the causes and effects of dental cavities is very important to do from an early age.

Find out about teaching kids about the causes and effects of dental cavities with help from a dental expert in this free video clip.

Series Description:


Dental health is important for people of all ages for a number of reasons.

Get tips on dental health and taking care of your teeth with help from a dental expert in this free video series.

Read Also: ORAL HYGIENE: Brushing a baby's teeth


Youtube / ehowhealth

3/08/2020

Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) – factors affecting success

ART

The success of tooth restorations rendered according to principles of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach is dependant on various clinical factors.

The most common failures, due to these factors, are partial material loss; complete material loss; caries related to restoration margin and material wear > 0.5mm.

The main reason for clinical ART failures are related to operator skills and performance.


The prevention and management of ART failures includes emphasis on correct clinical indication and the repair of failed restorations.

A new caries classification may provide guidance for clinical indication. The classification combines site and size of a lesion, which is reflected in a dual coding system.

Read Also: ORAL PATHOLOGY : Guideline on Dental Management of Heritable Dental Developmental Anomalies

In addition, ART training and diligence during ART application are important for clinical success.

The success of tooth restorations rendered according to principles of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach is dependant on various clinical factors.

The most common failures, due to these factors, are: · Partial material loss, · Complete material loss, · Caries related to restoration margin. · Material wear > 0.5mm.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°Journal of Applied Oral Science
°Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) – factors affecting success
°Steffen Mickenautsch / Elly Grossman

3/06/2020

Complete mouth rehabilitation of children with early childhood caries

Dental Caries

Early childhood caries (ECC) is the presence of one or more decayed, missing or filled tooth (DMFS) surfaces in any primary tooth in a child 71 months of age or younger.

In children aged 3–5 years, severe ECC (S-ECC) is defined as: one or more cavitated, missing (due to caries) or smooth filled surfaces in primary maxillary anterior teeth, or DMFS scores of ≥4 (age 3), ≥5 (age 4), or ≥6 (age 5).

It follows a characteristic pattern of development: maxillary incisors are affected first followed by maxillary then mandibular molars, and due to the protective nature of the tongue, the mandibular incisors are often spared.


ECC has multifactorial etiology. One of the reasons is improper feeding practices adopted and adoption of more cariogenic food with the weaning of milk during this age.

The loss of anterior teeth in children can lead to reduced vertical dimension and unesthetic smile which effect the child psychologically. Thus, it can interfere with the personality and behavioral development of the child.

Read Also: ORTHODONTIC : Dental disorders are linked to mouth breathing

When these teeth are lost, replacement, and prosthetic management is very important to restore all functions including esthetics of the child. Treatment of S-ECC is complex and expensive, often requiring extensive restorative treatment and extraction of teeth at an early age.

The most challenging in treatment of ECC is that children with age group 2–5 years are least manageable group of patients.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° ijpedor.org
° Divya Doneria / Seema Thakur / Parul Singhal / Deepak Chauhan

2/29/2020

TOOTH DECAY : Severe early childhood caries: an integral approach

TOOTH DECAY

Dental caries is the most common chronic disease in childhood, consisting in a severe problem for worldwide public health.

An important factor that must be considered is the fact that it can be prevented, controlled or even resolved.

In order to prevent it, it is necessary to know its etiology and the risk factors contributing to its development.


Control and reversion of such disease are possible if the diagnosis is established at the initial stage, which is characterized by the presence of white spots on tooth enamel without cavities.

When there are dental cavities, there is need of curative and preventive treatment with the purpose of changing the factors that led to the development of dental caries.

Disease progression can cause great damage to teeth, or even tooth loss, and it may result in local, systemic, psychological and social complications.

Read Also: Dental do's and don’ts during pregnancy

Definition of early childhood caries

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) classifies early childhood caries as the presence of one or more decayed (noncavitated or cavitated lesions), missing (due to caries), or filled tooth surfaces in any primary tooth in a child 71 months of age or younger.

However, any sign of smooth surface caries, with or without cavity, in children younger than 3 years old, is considered severe early childhood caries (S-ECC).

This disease has rampant, acute and progressive characteristics.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°Jornal de Pediatria
°Severe early childhood caries: an integral approach
°Estela M. Losso / Maria Cristina R. Tavares / Juliana Y. B. da Silva / Cícero de A. Urban

2/23/2020

TOOTH DECAY: How to prevent baby bottle tooth decay

Tooth Decay

Tooth decay in infants and very young children is often referred to as baby bottle tooth decay.

Baby bottle tooth decay happens when sweetened liquids or those with natural sugars (like milk, formula, and fruit juice) cling to an infant's teeth for a long time. Bacteria in the mouth thrive on this sugar and make acids that attack the teeth.

At risk are children whose pacifiers are frequently dipped in sugar or syrup.


Giving an infant a sugary drink at nap time or nighttime is particularly harmful because the flow of saliva decreases during sleep.

Although baby bottle tooth decay typically happens in the upper front teeth, other teeth may also be affected.

Read Also: The Importance of Oral Health during Pregnancy

Think baby teeth are temporary, and therefore, not important? Think again. Baby teeth are necessary for chewing, speaking, and smiling. They also serve as placeholders for the adult teeth.

If baby bottle tooth decay is left untreated, pain and infection can result. Severely decayed teeth may need to be removed.


Youtube / Diario de Pernambuco

2/20/2020

What is Early Childhood Caries ?

Early Childhood Caries

Early childhood caries (ECC), also known as baby bottle tooth decay (BBTD) is a preventable, infectious disease caused by certain types of bacteria (bugs) that live in your mouth. Bacteria stick to the film on your teeth called plaque.

The bacteria feed on what you eat, especially sugars (including fruit sugars) and cooked starch (bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, etc.).

About 5 minutes after you eat, or drink, the bacteria begin making acids as they digest your food.


These acids can break down the tooth’s outer surface and dissolve valuable minerals.

The result is cavities. Children who snack frequently, have a high level of bacteria, or go to sleep with a bottle containing anything other than water, are more likely to have ECC.

Read Also: Amelogenesis Imperfecta with Anterior Open Bite: A Rare Case Report

Many parents do not realize that nutritious food and drinks such as milk, formula, breast milk, and fruit juice have naturally occurring sugars that contribute to the decay process.

When children go to bed with a bottle containing milk for example, liquid sits in the child’s mouth for an extended period creating a perfect environment for bacteria.

You can’t stop feeding your child nutritious food, but you can regulate when and how often your child is exposed to “sugar hits.”

Limit between meal snacking and if a bottle is needed, use only water at nap/bed time.


Youtube / Anderson Dental

2/17/2020

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY : What causes cavities?

Tooth Decay

When a team of archeologists recently came across some 15,000-year-old human remains, they made an interesting discovery: the teeth of those ancient humans were riddled with holes.

So what causes cavities, and how can we avoid them? Mel Rosenberg takes us inside our teeth to find out.

Cavities are what you get from tooth decay -- damage to the tooth. Tooth decay can affect both the outer coating of a tooth (called enamel) and the inner layer (called dentin).


What causes decay? When foods with carbohydrates like bread, cereal, milk, soda, fruit, cake, or candy stay on your teeth.

The bacteria in your mouth turn them into acids. The bacteria, acid, food debris, and your saliva combine to form plaque, which clings to the teeth. The acids in plaque dissolve the enamel, creating holes called cavities.

Read Also: ORAL PATHOLOGY : Residual Neonatal Teeth: A Case Report


Youtube / TED-Ed

2/15/2020

Baby Bottle TOOTH DECAY : Causes and Prevention

Tooth Decay

Even though they are temporary, your child's baby teeth are important, and are still susceptible to cavities.

Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or Early Childhood Caries.

Children need strong, healthy teeth to chew their food, speak and have a good-looking smile.


Their first teeth also help make sure their adult teeth come in correctly.

It’s important to start infants off with good oral care to help protect their teeth for decades to come.

► Read Also:

° Atraumatic Restorative Treatment : step-by-step
° ORAL HEALTH : What Is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected.

There are many factors which can cause tooth decay. One common cause is the frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar.

Tooth decay can occur when the baby is put to bed with a bottle, or when a bottle is used as a pacifier for a fussy baby.


Youtube / South Dental

2/14/2020

Dental disease in children with chronic illness

Dental Caries

This article aims to raise awareness among paediatricians and specialist paediatric services that poor oral health, in particular children with chronic illness, is a major cause of morbidity and can be a risk factor for severe, even life threatening complications.

Good oral health and dentition is important for efficient mastication, speaking and of course, cosmetically for smiling. If left untreated, dental caries can lead to pain and infection.

Chronic infection around one or more teeth can result in damage to localised structures, such as the developing permanent teeth.


Children who are medically compromised (such as being immunocompromised from disease and/or therapy) however are at increased risk of developing systemic complications from dental infections, which may prove fatal.

We focus on the role of the general paediatrician in promoting the importance of good dental health for all children and in particular those children “at risk”.

Read Also: EMERGENCY : Multidisciplinary approach in the immediate replantation of a maxillary central incisor

We present preventive measures, evidence based where available, that may improve dental care and promote the role of paediatric dental services in the multidisciplinary management of chronic disease.

For this article we have used the term “poor oral health” to encompass caries (tooth decay), and periodontal disease (gingivitis and periodontitis).

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


Souce : adc.bmj.com
Authors : H Foster / J Fitzgerald

2/10/2020

ORAL REHABILITATION of patient with severe early childhood caries

Oral Rehabilitation

Currently, the aiming of Pediatric Dentistry is that the patient reaches maturity free of diseases affecting in oral cavity.
It is important that its action initiates during pregnancy and continues up to the birth of the baby.

Thus, preventive measures of oral diseases should begin at the pregnancy period through guidance for an adequate feeding of the mother, rich in vitaminic elements required for tooth formation.


Additionally, information on oral health related to both the mother and infant is part of the prenatal examination, assuring that the infant has a childhood free of caries.

However, unfortunately this is not the reality faced by all children. Tooth caries is the most common chronic disease in childhood and a great problem for world public health.

Read Also: ORAL MEDICINE : How to manage a pediatric patient with oral ulcers

Severe early childhood caries (S-ECC) is common and damages speech, swallowing, feeding, development (height and weight), esthetics and emotional (self-esteem) of the child.

Habits, such the unrestricted use of baby bottle, mainly with sugar content during night, are associated with S-ECC. The difficulty in performing oral hygiene of the child and maintenance of food remnants during longer periods, mainly during sleepiness, also contributes for the establishment of the disease.

The initial clinical sign of caries is the presence of opaque and white spots. If not controlled, the process evolves to the appearance of cavities, and this can lead to the destruction of all tooth crown and initiate infectious root processes because of pulp involvement.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°revodonto.bvsalud.org
°Luciana Pedroso / Camila Zucuni / Letícia Westphalen Bento / Juliana Yassue Barbosa da Silva / Bianca Zimmermann Santos

ORAL HEALTH : What Is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

Oral Health

Tooth decay in infants and very young children is often referred to as baby bottle tooth decay.

Baby bottle tooth decay happens when sweetened liquids or those with natural sugars (like milk, formula, and fruit juice) cling to an infant's teeth for a long time.

Bacteria in the mouth thrive on this sugar and make acids that attack the teeth. At risk are children whose pacifiers are frequently dipped in sugar or syrup.


Giving an infant a sugary drink at nap time or nighttime is particularity harmful, as the flow of saliva decreases during sleep.

Although baby bottle tooth decay typically happens in the upper front teeth, other teeth may also be affected.

Think baby teeth are temporary, and therefore, not important? Think again. Baby teeth are necessary for chewing, speaking, and smiling.

Read Also: Oral health and pregnancy

They also serve as placeholders for the adult teeth. If baby bottle tooth decay is left untreated, pain and infection can result. Severely decayed teeth may need to be removed.

If teeth are infected or lost too early due to baby bottle tooth decay, your child may develop poor eating habits, speech problems, crooked teeth, and damaged adult teeth. In addition, the chances that adult teeth will end up being crooked are greatly increased.

The good news is that a few simple steps can help stave off baby bottle tooth decay.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


webmd.com

10/06/2019

Full-Mouth Restoration of a Severely Decayed Dentition

Rehabilitation

Patients present to the dental office with a variety of needs both pressing and unique; some require a hygiene appointment and routine clinical examination, while others present with much greater challenges.

In all cases, patients present with hope: that their teeth are cavity free, the nagging pain in one of their molars is a simple fix, a cosmetic concern can be corrected, or perhaps years of poor oral hygiene and the resulting decay can be repaired, allowing a fresh start with a healthy smile.


Such was the case with the full-mouth restorative case detailed below.

Read Also: ORAL HYGIENE : How to prevent tooth decay in children?

The patient had presented to the author’s office with extensive dental decay on both arches, the end result of years of neglect and poor oral hygiene, and was eager to save his teeth through extensive surgical and restorative therapies.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


dentalcetoday.com
Authored by Steven T. Cutbirth, DDS

2/25/2019

Do children need filling of milk tooth?

Oral Hygiene

Milk teeth in children start erupting from about 6 months of age up to about 6 years or 7 years of age.

After which they start falling off till about 12 years of age, this is General pattern but there can be c a little variation of about 1 year in this pattern.

This evidence could have an important implication for women and babies' heath since simple improvement of dental hygiene may help to reduce the incidence of unknown complications in pregnancy and newborn babies.


A misconception among parents is that since milk teeth are going to fall off why fill them.

Now milk teeth are like normal teeth which can cause severe pain and infection in a child and child may suffer.

Read Also: ORAL HYGIENE: How to prevent tooth decay in children?

Filling of milk teeth is as important as filling of permanent teeth because of the infection and pain progress the child suffers and lead to fever also and subsequently to as-2 going for root canal treatment.


Youtube / Doctors' Circle - World's Largest Health Platform