Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Pediatric Dentistry. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Pediatric Dentistry. Mostrar todas las entradas

4/14/2020

CLINICAL CASE : Brain abscess secondary to a dental infection in an 11 year old child

Clinical Case

A primary molar dental abscess was implicated as the cause of a brain abscess in an 11-year-old boy.

This case report describes the neurological signs and symptoms, and acute management of a brain abscess in a child.

A brain abscess is provisionally diagnosed from the patient’s medical history, as well as the presence of signs and symptoms such as fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, focal neurological deficit, altered mentation, speech alterations, papillary edema, and neck stiffness or seizures.


A definitive diagnosis of brain abscess is confirmed through imaging.

The dental source of infection is identified by the exclusion of more probable foci such as the ears, heart, lungs, eyes or sinuses.

Read Also: EMERGENCY : Multidisciplinary approach in the immediate replantation of a maxillary central incisor

Introduction : Dental abscesses and facial cellulitis put dentists on alert for potentially life-threatening conditions such as sepsis or airway obstruction, but the risk of a brain abscess is a complication of odontogenic infection that dentists rarely consider.

This report describes the case of an 11-year-old boy whose brain abscess and associated neurological signs were most likely attributable to an abscessed primary molar.

The description of the neurological signs and symptoms, and the history and management of this case will inform dentists about the real possibility of a brain abscess of dental origin.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°jcda.ca
°Canadian Dental Association
°Dr. Hibberd / Dr. Nguyen

4/06/2020

ORTHODONTIC : Guiding Unerupted Teeth into Occlusion: Case Report

ORTHODONTIC

Tooth eruption is considered to be delayed if emergence of a tooth into the oral cavity occurs at a time deviating significantly from norms established for the person’s sex and ethnic background.

Generally, a permanent tooth should erupt no later than 6 months after natural exfoliation of its predecessor, but a delay of up to 12 months may be of little or no importance in an otherwise healthy child.

Therefore, most practitioners consider eruption delayed only if the interval extends to more than 1 year.



Eruption of a tooth is considered to be delayed (i.e., the tooth is impacted) when all of the following conditions exist:

a. The normal time for eruption has been exceeded.
b. The tooth is not present in the dental arch and shows no potential for eruption.
c. The root of the unerupted tooth is completely formed.
d. The homologous tooth has been erupted for at least 6 months.

Read Also: DENTAL TRAUMA : A story of dental injury and orthodontics

Case Report . Diagnosis
A preadolescent girl (9 years, 2 months of age) and her mother presented to a private practice. The patient was “missing a front permanent tooth,” a situation that was esthetically displeasing to both the child and the mother.

A supernumerary tooth had been extracted when the patient was 7 years of age, and she had been advised to await eruption of the permanent successor tooth.

Clinical examination at the time of the current presentation revealed good oral health and mixed dentition.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


jcda.ca
Seema B. Shah, BDS, MFDS RCS (Eng); Gajanan Kulkarni, BDS, LLB, MSc, D Ped Dent, PhD, FRCD(C)



4/05/2020

ORAL PATHOLOGY : Congenital epulis with auto-resolution: case report

Congenital epulis

Congenital epulis is an uncommon benign lesion that affects the oral cavity of newborns, and presents histological features which are similar to those of granular cell tumor.

The origin of this lesion has not been fully elucidated, and many hypotheses are considered due to the large variety of cell types observed in histological sections.

Epulis development occurs further in the prenatal period, and is more common in newborn females, frequently in the maxilla.



This lesion usually is presentend as a nodule covered by normal oral mucosa, which in some cases, interferes with baby's breathing and feeding.

This report describes the case of a two-month-old male baby who presented a pedunculated intraoral lesion in the mandibular alveolar ridge.

Read Also: Reimplantation of avulsed dry permanent teeth after three days

Histological sections revealed presence of mucosal fragments with atrophic squamous stratified epithelium, and fibrous connective tissue composed of cells with granular and eosinophilic cytoplasm.

A few days after initial exam, the lesion detached from alveolar ridge, and healed spontaneously.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° Adriane Sousa de SIQUEIRA, Márcia Regina Dias de CARVALHO, Ana Celina Dourado MONTEIRO, Maria das Graças Rodrigues PINHEIRO, Lucas Rodrigues PINHEIRO, João de Jesus Viana PINHEIRO



Early Premolar Extraction: An Uncommon but Very Effective Treatment Option

Orthodontic

The terminology “serial extraction” in Orthodontics was first described in the late 1920’s when Kjellgren decided to plan the extraction of certain deciduous and permanent teeth at early stages of the dentition development.

Since the extractions are under taken at the transitional dentition. This type of treatment is defined as “Early Treatment” in Orthodontics.

The main indication for this treatment approach is for patients with severe crowding caused by tooth size arch discrepancies. In other words, when maxillary and/or mandibular arches cannot accommodate teeth, extraction becomes an interesting option.



Although this treatment option has been used for almost a century in the contemporary orthodontics it’s indication is very specific.

Since it’s an irreversible approach (permanent teeth are early extracted) the clinician should carefully diagnosis the case before selecting this option.

Read Also: ORTHODONTICS : Serial extraction of primary teeth

In addition, as time passed by, orthodontics specialty has dramatically evolved and developed several options to gain space instead of extracting teeth.

On the other hand, the idea to early extract permanent teeth continues to be an interesting treatment option in clinical orthodontics mainly in severely crowded patients.

The aim of this paper is to present a case report of a ten-year-old male patient who presented severe crowding and treatment option was to extract four first premolars at early stages of the dentition development.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° Adeniyi M J, A O Soladoye. Plasma Lipid Profile and Uric Acid in High Fat Fed Female Rats Treated with Oral Contraceptive. Biomed J Sci & Tech Res 1(3)-2017. BJSTR. MS.ID.000256. DOI: 10.26717/BJSTR.2017.01.000256



4/04/2020

Inhalation conscious sedation with nitrous oxide/oxygen in pediatric dentistry

Sedation

Conscious sedation is a technique in which one or more pharmacological agents are employed to produce a mild depression in the central nervous system, without loss of consciousness so that verbal contact can always be maintained with the patient; this allows for certain dental procedures to be performed.

The technique is associated with a great margin of safety.

In Odontopediatrics, the sedative agents generally employed are nitrous oxide (N2O) and benzodiazepines, amongst other agents with sedative properties.



The use of nitrous oxide/oxygen (N2O) is becoming more frequent for general and pediatric procedures in dental medicine and has become common practice in many countries.

Read Also: ORAL SURGERY : Guideline on Pediatric Oral Surgery

It is also frequently used in general pediatric medicine for procedures ranging from minor surgery to more invasive diagnostic procedures.

Nitrous oxide, or protoxide of nitrogen (N2O), is a colorless gas with a sweetish taste. It has an anxiolytic and sedative effect, and also promotes muscular relaxation and analgesia.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° Ana Catarina Barroso Macedo Barbosa / Joana Moura˜oII, Virgınia Milagre / David Casimiro de Andrade / Cristina Areias



PREVENTION : Why are Fluoride Treatments Important for Kids?

Prevention

Fluoride is a mineral compound containing fluorine, a naturally occurring element.

It helps prevent tooth decay by making the tooth more resistant to acid and plaque and strengthens the enamel by replacing nutrients.

While small amounts of fluoride are found in many toothpastes, rinses and city water sources, the fluoride treatments used in our dental office are much more concentrated.



Studies have shown that children who receive regular fluoride treatments, once every 6 months, may have up to 40% fewer cavities than those who do not.

Fluoride treatment is easy and affordable. Dr. Kailes recommends topical fluoride varnish treatments for all children every 6 months.

Read Also: Fluoride varnish in primary dentition positively affects caries prevention

Fluoride varnish is much easier and more enjoyable than traditional fluoride rinses, foams and trays; and does not require any waiting to eat or drink afterwards.

After teeth are cleaned, the assistant will quickly paint the varnish on the teeth. When it comes in contact with the tooth, it spreads across the entire tooth surface and is absorbed over the next 24 hours.


Youtube / GrowingHealthySmiles



4/03/2020

Deformity of the tongue in an infant: Riga-Fede disease

Dental Emergency

Riga-Fede is the rare condition of benign ulceration caused by repeti-tive trauma to the lingual tissues by the teeth in children younger than two years of age.

The differential diagnosis includes infective and neoplastic conditions.

Histological diagnosis is required when the symptoms fail to resolve with standard management.

The case involv-ing an 11-month-old girl who presented with ulceration of the tongue, resulting in a reasonable defect of the tongue tip, is reported in the present article.

Read Also: Idiopathic Gingival Hyperplasia: A Case Report with a 17-Year Followup

Following excisional biopsy, the lesion healed without subsequent recurrence.

Riga-Fede disease should be consid-ered in infants presenting with oral ulceration. Extraction of the offending teeth should be considered when associated with failure to thrive or failed conservative management.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°researchgate.net
°Karen A Eley / Pauline A Watt-Smith / Stephen R Watt-Smith