Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Orthodontic. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Orthodontic. Mostrar todas las entradas

4/06/2020

ORTHODONTIC : Guiding Unerupted Teeth into Occlusion: Case Report

ORTHODONTIC

Tooth eruption is considered to be delayed if emergence of a tooth into the oral cavity occurs at a time deviating significantly from norms established for the person’s sex and ethnic background.

Generally, a permanent tooth should erupt no later than 6 months after natural exfoliation of its predecessor, but a delay of up to 12 months may be of little or no importance in an otherwise healthy child.

Therefore, most practitioners consider eruption delayed only if the interval extends to more than 1 year.



Eruption of a tooth is considered to be delayed (i.e., the tooth is impacted) when all of the following conditions exist:

a. The normal time for eruption has been exceeded.
b. The tooth is not present in the dental arch and shows no potential for eruption.
c. The root of the unerupted tooth is completely formed.
d. The homologous tooth has been erupted for at least 6 months.

Read Also: DENTAL TRAUMA : A story of dental injury and orthodontics

Case Report . Diagnosis
A preadolescent girl (9 years, 2 months of age) and her mother presented to a private practice. The patient was “missing a front permanent tooth,” a situation that was esthetically displeasing to both the child and the mother.

A supernumerary tooth had been extracted when the patient was 7 years of age, and she had been advised to await eruption of the permanent successor tooth.

Clinical examination at the time of the current presentation revealed good oral health and mixed dentition.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


jcda.ca
Seema B. Shah, BDS, MFDS RCS (Eng); Gajanan Kulkarni, BDS, LLB, MSc, D Ped Dent, PhD, FRCD(C)



4/05/2020

Early Premolar Extraction: An Uncommon but Very Effective Treatment Option

Orthodontic

The terminology “serial extraction” in Orthodontics was first described in the late 1920’s when Kjellgren decided to plan the extraction of certain deciduous and permanent teeth at early stages of the dentition development.

Since the extractions are under taken at the transitional dentition. This type of treatment is defined as “Early Treatment” in Orthodontics.

The main indication for this treatment approach is for patients with severe crowding caused by tooth size arch discrepancies. In other words, when maxillary and/or mandibular arches cannot accommodate teeth, extraction becomes an interesting option.



Although this treatment option has been used for almost a century in the contemporary orthodontics it’s indication is very specific.

Since it’s an irreversible approach (permanent teeth are early extracted) the clinician should carefully diagnosis the case before selecting this option.

Read Also: ORTHODONTICS : Serial extraction of primary teeth

In addition, as time passed by, orthodontics specialty has dramatically evolved and developed several options to gain space instead of extracting teeth.

On the other hand, the idea to early extract permanent teeth continues to be an interesting treatment option in clinical orthodontics mainly in severely crowded patients.

The aim of this paper is to present a case report of a ten-year-old male patient who presented severe crowding and treatment option was to extract four first premolars at early stages of the dentition development.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° Adeniyi M J, A O Soladoye. Plasma Lipid Profile and Uric Acid in High Fat Fed Female Rats Treated with Oral Contraceptive. Biomed J Sci & Tech Res 1(3)-2017. BJSTR. MS.ID.000256. DOI: 10.26717/BJSTR.2017.01.000256



4/03/2020

ORTHODONTIC : Tongue thrusting habit: A review

Orthodontic

Deleterious oral habits are the common problem of pediatricians, which aff ects the quality of life.

Oral habits are repetitive behavior in the oral cavity that result in loss of tooth structure and they include digit sucking, pacifi er sucking, lip sucking and biting, nailbiting, bruxism, self-injurious habits, mouth breathing and tongue thrusting.

Para functional habits are recognized as a major etiological factor for the development of dental malocclusion. Thumb sucking and tongue thrusting is the common ones.

Abnormal tongue function and posture have been long debated as a cause of malocclusion. Lefoulon, in 1839 quoted “prevention is better than cure.”

Understanding the etiology, eff ects and it management at early stages may be helpful to prevent future severe skeletal malocclusion. This review deals with these aspects of tongue thrusting habit.

Read Also: ORTHODONTIC : Serial Extractions in orthodontic – A Review

Definition

Tulley 1969 - states tongue thrust as the forward movement of the tongue tip between the teeth to meet the lower lip during deglutition and in sounds of speech, so that the tongue becomes interdental.

Tongue thrust is an oral habit pattern related to the persistence of an infantile swallow pattern during childhood and adolescence and thereby produces an open bite and protrusion of the anterior tooth segment.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°ijcdmr.com
°International Journal of Contemporary Dental and Medical Reviews
°Suchita Madhukar Tarvade, Sheetal Ramkrishna



3/31/2020

How early can we intercept a malocclusion in children

Orthodontic

Etiology of malocclusion can be the cause of deviation in the skeleton, dental, and soft tissue development in children.

Identifying etiology of malocclusion and dominant orthodontic problems as well as early detection could help in future effective treatment, management, and public health planning.

Malocclusions in children is an increasing problem, which in many cases is misdiagnosed.

A recent study reported that around 90 percent of the children in primary and early mixed dentition present signs of a developing malocclusion.

Read Also: ORAL MEDICINE : Clinical Management of Regional Odontodysplasia. Clinical Case


Youtube / Kidsmalocclusions 1
Image : Decisions in Dentistry



ORTHODONTIC : Diagnosing Early Interceptive Orthodontic Problems – Part 1

Emergency Pediatric Dentistry

It is important to have a clear picture of how a child is changing dentally and skeletally throughout his or her growth period.

In fact the American Association of Orthodontists recommends that every child have an orthodontic examination by the age of seven.


The early treatment examination in the mixed dentition enables the practitioner to identify problems at an early stage, and to determine when to commence treatment and/or refer patients to an orthodontist.

Things to look for during a mixed dentition examination include crowding of permanent teeth, excessive overjet or overbite, missing primary teeth needed for space maintenance, supernumerary teeth, skeletal discrepancies, habits, airway problems, and eruption path problems.

Read Also: ORTHODONTICS : Serial extraction of primary teeth

Introduction

This continuing dental education article is being written to describe the need for early examination and diagnosis of malocclusions in growing children.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°dentalacademyofce.com
°Diagnosing Early Interceptive Orthodontic Problems – Part 1
°Written by: Michael Florman, DDS / Rob Veis, DDS / Mark M. Alarabi, DDS, CECSMO / Mahtab Partovi, DDS

3/28/2020

When do kids need to go to the orthodontist?

Orthodontic

Previously orthodontic treatment was carried out on children in their teenage years.

Today, however, many children start orthodontic treatment at a much younger age.

There are also large numbers of adults receiving orthodontic treatment.


At what age do you consider braces?

Traditional “train-track” braces are fitted to a child’s adult teeth and are used to move, realign and/or rotate a tooth or teeth into the correct position.

This is why you'll usually see children 10 years and older wearing these types of braces. However, crowded/crooked/skew adult teeth usually manifest because of a space shortage and/or a problem with jaw growth and/or jaw relationships.

Read Also: PERIODONTICS : Gingivitis in Children and Adolescents

This can usually be identified in young children, even before many of their adult teeth start coming through.

The big shift in orthodontics has been to check children at a much younger age, identify these issues earlier and intervene before the arrival of the adult teeth.

In many cases, early intervention can provide future adult teeth with all the space they need and the child may not have to wear conventional braces at all.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


health24.com
Dr Simon Reeves

3/27/2020

ORTHODONTIC : Association between oral habits, mouth breathing and malocclusion

Orthodontic

The ratio of bad habits, mouth breathing and malocclusion is an important issue in view of prevention and early treatment of disorders of the craniofacial growth.

While bad habits can interfere with the position of the teeth and normal pattern of skeletal growth, on the other hand obstruction of the upper airway, resulting in mouth breathing, changes the pattern of craniofacial growth causing malocclusion.

Our crosssectional study, carried out on 3017 children using the ROMA index, was developed to verify if there was a significant correlation between bad habits/mouth breathing and malocclusion.


The results showed that an increase in the degree of the index increases the prevalence of bad habits and mouth breathing, meaning that these factors are associated with more severe malocclusions.

Moreover, we found a significant association of bad habits with increased overjet and openbite, while no association was found with crossbite.

Read Also: ORAL MEDICINE : How to treat oral thrush in newborns

Additionally, we found that mouth breathing is closely related to increased overjet, reduced overjet, anterior or posterior crossbite, openbite and displacement of contact points.

Therefore, it is necessary to intervene early on these aetiological factors of malocclusion to prevent its development or worsening and, if already developed, correct it by early orthodontic treatment to promote eugnatic skeletal growth.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


C. Grippaudo, G. Antonini, R. Saulle, G. La Torre, and R. Deli