Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Oral health. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Oral health. Mostrar todas las entradas

4/14/2020

ORAL HYGIENE : How to Clean a Baby's Gums

Oral Hygiene

The road to your baby's first birthday is full of milestones, from solid foods to first steps.

But it's the most picture-worthy milestone – your child's first smile – that reflects the importance of good oral health even before his or her baby teeth erupt.

Even before your baby sports his first tooth, it's a good idea to get into the habit of wiping his gums with gauze or a soft wet washcloth during bath time.



You don't need to use any toothpaste yet. Simply wrap the cloth or gauze around your index finger and rub it gently over his gums.

Bacteria in the mouth usually can't harm the gums before the teeth emerge, but it can be hard to tell when the teeth are starting to push through, so you'll want to start early.

Getting your baby used to having his mouth cleaned as part of his daily routine should make it easier to transition into toothbrushing later on, too.

Read Also: ORAL HYGIENE: Brushing a baby's teeth

Although clamp and scissors are used in this video, alternatively, a laser can also be used. Keep in mind, video is for release and NOT frenulectomy.


Youtube / Howcast



4/05/2020

ORAL PATHOLOGY : Congenital epulis with auto-resolution: case report

Congenital epulis

Congenital epulis is an uncommon benign lesion that affects the oral cavity of newborns, and presents histological features which are similar to those of granular cell tumor.

The origin of this lesion has not been fully elucidated, and many hypotheses are considered due to the large variety of cell types observed in histological sections.

Epulis development occurs further in the prenatal period, and is more common in newborn females, frequently in the maxilla.



This lesion usually is presentend as a nodule covered by normal oral mucosa, which in some cases, interferes with baby's breathing and feeding.

This report describes the case of a two-month-old male baby who presented a pedunculated intraoral lesion in the mandibular alveolar ridge.

Read Also: Reimplantation of avulsed dry permanent teeth after three days

Histological sections revealed presence of mucosal fragments with atrophic squamous stratified epithelium, and fibrous connective tissue composed of cells with granular and eosinophilic cytoplasm.

A few days after initial exam, the lesion detached from alveolar ridge, and healed spontaneously.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° Adriane Sousa de SIQUEIRA, Márcia Regina Dias de CARVALHO, Ana Celina Dourado MONTEIRO, Maria das Graças Rodrigues PINHEIRO, Lucas Rodrigues PINHEIRO, João de Jesus Viana PINHEIRO



4/02/2020

Clinical Case: Upper Lip Tie Release Treatment

Upper lip

A tongue-tie is an unusually short, thick or tight band of tissue (lingual frenulum) that tethers the bottom of the tongue’s tip to the floor of the mouth, limiting mobility.

Likewise, a lip-tie (labial frenulum) is a short, thick or tight band of tissue that tethers the upper lip to the upper gums, limiting the lip’s ability to flare and curl.

Symptoms of Tongue & Lip-Tie

Tongue and lip-ties are serious and lead to many oral and health risks, and most often cause pain to the breastfeeding mother. Both mother and baby will demonstrate symptoms when baby has a tongue and/or lip-tie.

Video explaining how upper lip tie release is performed.

Read Also: Pulpotomy medicaments used in deciduous dentition

Although clamp and scissors are used in this video, alternatively, a laser can also be used. Keep in mind, video is for release and NOT frenulectomy.


Youtube / Real World Endo



3/31/2020

ORAL HYGIENE : How to prevent tooth decay in children?

Oral Hygiene

Tooth decay, also known as dental cavities or caries, is the most common dental problem amongst children.

It can cause painful holes (cavities) in your teeth.

Cavities usually need to be drilled and then filled to keep the tooth decay from getting worse.

But doing certain things can help to prevent the need for treatment in the first place.

The most effective way to prevent tooth decay is by regularly brushing your teeth and strengthening them with fluoride.

Sticking to a healthy diet and not eating too much candy or sweets is also good for your teeth. Last but not least, dental check-ups can help detect and treat tooth decay early on.

Read Also: What is Early Childhood Caries ?

Tooth decay is mainly caused by bacteria in the plaque that coats your teeth, and by too much sugar in your diet.

So limiting your consumption of sugary foods, drinks, candies and gum is one way to prevent tooth decay.

Eating sweet things every once in a while is perfectly fine, though, as long as you still take good care of your teeth.


Youtube / Doctors' Circle - Ask Doctors. Free Video Answers



3/30/2020

ENDODONTICS : Is root canal treatment required in milk teeth?


Especially for baby teeth parents think that if the tooth is going to fall off why do we need a root canal treatment.

We do root canal treatment when the decay usually effects the enamel crosses the enamel goes to the dentin from the dentin to the inner nerve or the pulp of the tooth at thus stage we really can't get off the with just doing the filling in the tooth that's when the nerve of the tooth is treated.

So during the root canal treatment we do remove the nerve of the tooth and filling material is placed inside the root and a tooth colored cap is placed on top to restore the tooth.

If the child is very young we do need to keep it till 12-13 years, that tooth is going to last them long and exfoliate at the right time, that in turn effecting the permanent tooth erupt normally.

Read Also: DENTAL TRAUMA : Treatment options for broken down permanent teeth in the mixed dentition

Hence it is very important to do a root canal treatment if it is needed in a primary teeth and also if left untreated it can lead to causing of an abases, bone loss underneath that can cause severe pain and infection in the tooth.


Youtube / Doctors' Circle - Ask Doctors. Free Video Answers.



How Breastfeeding Could Improve Babies’ Dental Health

Oral Health

The more babies breast-feed, the less likely it is that they will develop any kind of misalignment in their teeth later on, a new study shows.

But pacifiers can negate some of that potential benefit, even if the children are breast-feeding, the Australian researchers said.

“While most benefits of breast-feeding can be attributed to the breast-milk, this study highlights one of the ways that the actual act of breast-feeding imparts its own benefits,” said Dr. Joanna Pierro, a pediatric chief resident at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City.

“While it is well established that exclusively breast-fed babies are at a decreased risk of dental malocclusion [misalignment], this study revealed the differences between those exclusively breast-fed versus those who are predominantly breast-fed,” said Pierro, who was not involved in the study.

“Since many breast-fed babies today are partially fed breast-milk from a bottle, this research reveals how this difference affects the oral cavity,” she added.

The researchers, led by Karen Peres at the University of Adelaide in Australia, tracked just over 1,300 children for five years, including how much they breast-fed at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years old. The study authors also asked how often the children used a pacifier, if at all, when the kids were 3 months, 1 year, 2 and 4. About 40 percent of the children used a pacifier daily for four years.

When the children were 5, the researchers determined which of them had various types of misaligned teeth or jaw conditions, including open bite, crossbite, overbite or a moderate to severe misalignment.

The risk of overbite was one-third lower for those who exclusively breast-fed for three to six months compared to those who didn’t, the findings showed. If they breast-fed at least six months or more, the risk of overbite dropped by 44 percent.

Similarly, children who exclusively breast-fed for three months to six months were 41 percent less likely to have moderate to severe misalignment of the teeth. Breast-feeding six months or longer reduced their risk by 72 percent.

Read Also: CARIES : Does Breastfeeding Increase Risk of Early Childhood Caries?

The findings were published online June 15 in the journal Pediatrics. While the study found an association between breast-feeding and dental health, it did not prove a cause-and-effect link.

But Peres offered some possible explanations for the association.

“The plausible mechanisms which may explain the association between exclusive breast-feeding and lower risk of having [misaligned teeth or jaws] . . . include the adequate development of the orofacial structures in children who are breast-fed, such as proper muscular tone and nasal breathing,” Peres said. “In addition, children who are breast-fed are less likely to use a pacifier, which is considered a risk factor for malocclusion.”

Pierro explained it this way.

“Unlike feeding with a bottle, breast-feeding requires the baby to move her jaw and tongue in ways that help develop the oral cavity,” she said. “So long before baby breaks her first tooth, she is creating the foundation for proper alignment of the teeth.”

The findings may also reflect the effects of a baby getting regular jaw exercise through the act of breast-feeding, suggested Dr. Danelle Fisher, vice chair of pediatrics at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif.

“Breast-feeding requires the use of jaw muscles more so than bottle-feeding, so the mechanics of breast-feeding stimulate muscle tone in the jaw,” Fisher said.

Open bite, overbite and moderate to severe misalignment were generally less common overall among the children who mostly or exclusively breast-fed. Children who mostly breast-fed but also used pacifiers, however, were slightly more likely to have one of these misalignment issues, the study found.

“Pacifiers are used for non-nutritive sucking but when overused, they can put pressure on the developing jaw and lead to more problems in older children with malocclusion [teeth/jaw misalignment],” Fisher said.

That does not mean parents need to toss the pacifiers, however. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents consider using a pacifier for an infant’s first six months because pacifiers are associated with a reduced risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

“Most infants need to suck for comfort or non-nutritive sucking,” Fisher said. “Pacifiers can be helpful in the newborn period and even help reduce incidents of SIDS in infants who sleep with them.”

Instead, parents should simply limit pacifier use, she said. In addition, pacifiers are not needed past the first six to 12 months, Fisher said, so parents can begin weaning after that time.

news.health.com



ORAL MEDICINE : Clinical Management of Regional Odontodysplasia. Clinical Case

Oral Medicine

Regional odontodysplasia (ROD) is a relatively rare localized developmental anomaly of the dental tissues with specific clinical, radiographic, and histologic characteristics.

Crawford ascribed the first report of ROD to Hitchin in 1934, while others suggested that McCall and Wald were the first to describe this condition in 1947.

It was not until 1963, however, that Zegarelli et al coined the term “odontodysplasia” and Pindborg added the prefix “regional” in 1970.

In an extensive review of ROD in 1989, Crawford and Aldred stated females are more often affected than males (1.4:1) and that there was no association with race.

These authors listed several etiological factors such as local circulatory disorders, viral infections, pharmacotherapy during pregnancy, facial asymmetry, local trauma, metabolic disturbances, somatic and neural mutations, and syndromal involvement.

They also suggested that a combination of factors might be involved. In spite of this, ROD’s etiology remains undetermined.

Read Also: ORAL MEDICINE : How to treat oral thrush in newborns

The criteria for ROD diagnosis are based on clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings. The maxilla is typically affected twice as often as the mandible.

Clinically, the condition is usually unilateral and rarely crosses the midline; exceptions are, however, occasionally found. In most cases in which the damage crosses the midline, only the central incisor on the opposite side is affected.

The teeth are likely to be small, brown, grooved, and hypoplastic. Eruption failure or delay is frequently seen as well as abscesses or fistulae in the absence of caries.

Radiographically, there is a lack of contrast between the enamel and dentin, both of which are less radiopaque than unaffected counterparts.

Moreover, enamel and dentin layers are thin, giving the teeth a “ghost like” appearance. The pulp chambers are large, and usually present areas of relatively radiodense tissue (pulp stones or denticles). The follicles of unerupted teeth are enlarged.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° odontologiaparabebes.com
° Abel Cahuana, PhD, MD, DDS Yndira González, DDS Camila Palma, DDS