Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Oral health. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Oral health. Mostrar todas las entradas

4/14/2020

ORAL HYGIENE : How to Clean a Baby's Gums

Oral Hygiene

The road to your baby's first birthday is full of milestones, from solid foods to first steps.

But it's the most picture-worthy milestone – your child's first smile – that reflects the importance of good oral health even before his or her baby teeth erupt.

Even before your baby sports his first tooth, it's a good idea to get into the habit of wiping his gums with gauze or a soft wet washcloth during bath time.



You don't need to use any toothpaste yet. Simply wrap the cloth or gauze around your index finger and rub it gently over his gums.

Bacteria in the mouth usually can't harm the gums before the teeth emerge, but it can be hard to tell when the teeth are starting to push through, so you'll want to start early.

Getting your baby used to having his mouth cleaned as part of his daily routine should make it easier to transition into toothbrushing later on, too.

Read Also: ORAL HYGIENE: Brushing a baby's teeth

Although clamp and scissors are used in this video, alternatively, a laser can also be used. Keep in mind, video is for release and NOT frenulectomy.


Youtube / Howcast



4/05/2020

ORAL PATHOLOGY : Congenital epulis with auto-resolution: case report

Congenital epulis

Congenital epulis is an uncommon benign lesion that affects the oral cavity of newborns, and presents histological features which are similar to those of granular cell tumor.

The origin of this lesion has not been fully elucidated, and many hypotheses are considered due to the large variety of cell types observed in histological sections.

Epulis development occurs further in the prenatal period, and is more common in newborn females, frequently in the maxilla.



This lesion usually is presentend as a nodule covered by normal oral mucosa, which in some cases, interferes with baby's breathing and feeding.

This report describes the case of a two-month-old male baby who presented a pedunculated intraoral lesion in the mandibular alveolar ridge.

Read Also: Reimplantation of avulsed dry permanent teeth after three days

Histological sections revealed presence of mucosal fragments with atrophic squamous stratified epithelium, and fibrous connective tissue composed of cells with granular and eosinophilic cytoplasm.

A few days after initial exam, the lesion detached from alveolar ridge, and healed spontaneously.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° Adriane Sousa de SIQUEIRA, Márcia Regina Dias de CARVALHO, Ana Celina Dourado MONTEIRO, Maria das Graças Rodrigues PINHEIRO, Lucas Rodrigues PINHEIRO, João de Jesus Viana PINHEIRO



4/02/2020

Clinical Case: Upper Lip Tie Release Treatment

Upper lip

A tongue-tie is an unusually short, thick or tight band of tissue (lingual frenulum) that tethers the bottom of the tongue’s tip to the floor of the mouth, limiting mobility.

Likewise, a lip-tie (labial frenulum) is a short, thick or tight band of tissue that tethers the upper lip to the upper gums, limiting the lip’s ability to flare and curl.

Symptoms of Tongue & Lip-Tie

Tongue and lip-ties are serious and lead to many oral and health risks, and most often cause pain to the breastfeeding mother. Both mother and baby will demonstrate symptoms when baby has a tongue and/or lip-tie.

Video explaining how upper lip tie release is performed.

Read Also: Pulpotomy medicaments used in deciduous dentition

Although clamp and scissors are used in this video, alternatively, a laser can also be used. Keep in mind, video is for release and NOT frenulectomy.


Youtube / Real World Endo



3/31/2020

ORAL HYGIENE : How to prevent tooth decay in children?

Oral Hygiene

Tooth decay, also known as dental cavities or caries, is the most common dental problem amongst children.

It can cause painful holes (cavities) in your teeth.

Cavities usually need to be drilled and then filled to keep the tooth decay from getting worse.

But doing certain things can help to prevent the need for treatment in the first place.

The most effective way to prevent tooth decay is by regularly brushing your teeth and strengthening them with fluoride.

Sticking to a healthy diet and not eating too much candy or sweets is also good for your teeth. Last but not least, dental check-ups can help detect and treat tooth decay early on.

Read Also: What is Early Childhood Caries ?

Tooth decay is mainly caused by bacteria in the plaque that coats your teeth, and by too much sugar in your diet.

So limiting your consumption of sugary foods, drinks, candies and gum is one way to prevent tooth decay.

Eating sweet things every once in a while is perfectly fine, though, as long as you still take good care of your teeth.


Youtube / Doctors' Circle - Ask Doctors. Free Video Answers



3/30/2020

ENDODONTICS : Is root canal treatment required in milk teeth?


Especially for baby teeth parents think that if the tooth is going to fall off why do we need a root canal treatment.

We do root canal treatment when the decay usually effects the enamel crosses the enamel goes to the dentin from the dentin to the inner nerve or the pulp of the tooth at thus stage we really can't get off the with just doing the filling in the tooth that's when the nerve of the tooth is treated.

So during the root canal treatment we do remove the nerve of the tooth and filling material is placed inside the root and a tooth colored cap is placed on top to restore the tooth.

If the child is very young we do need to keep it till 12-13 years, that tooth is going to last them long and exfoliate at the right time, that in turn effecting the permanent tooth erupt normally.

Read Also: DENTAL TRAUMA : Treatment options for broken down permanent teeth in the mixed dentition

Hence it is very important to do a root canal treatment if it is needed in a primary teeth and also if left untreated it can lead to causing of an abases, bone loss underneath that can cause severe pain and infection in the tooth.


Youtube / Doctors' Circle - Ask Doctors. Free Video Answers.



How Breastfeeding Could Improve Babies’ Dental Health

Oral Health

The more babies breast-feed, the less likely it is that they will develop any kind of misalignment in their teeth later on, a new study shows.

But pacifiers can negate some of that potential benefit, even if the children are breast-feeding, the Australian researchers said.

“While most benefits of breast-feeding can be attributed to the breast-milk, this study highlights one of the ways that the actual act of breast-feeding imparts its own benefits,” said Dr. Joanna Pierro, a pediatric chief resident at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City.

“While it is well established that exclusively breast-fed babies are at a decreased risk of dental malocclusion [misalignment], this study revealed the differences between those exclusively breast-fed versus those who are predominantly breast-fed,” said Pierro, who was not involved in the study.

“Since many breast-fed babies today are partially fed breast-milk from a bottle, this research reveals how this difference affects the oral cavity,” she added.

The researchers, led by Karen Peres at the University of Adelaide in Australia, tracked just over 1,300 children for five years, including how much they breast-fed at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years old. The study authors also asked how often the children used a pacifier, if at all, when the kids were 3 months, 1 year, 2 and 4. About 40 percent of the children used a pacifier daily for four years.

When the children were 5, the researchers determined which of them had various types of misaligned teeth or jaw conditions, including open bite, crossbite, overbite or a moderate to severe misalignment.

The risk of overbite was one-third lower for those who exclusively breast-fed for three to six months compared to those who didn’t, the findings showed. If they breast-fed at least six months or more, the risk of overbite dropped by 44 percent.

Similarly, children who exclusively breast-fed for three months to six months were 41 percent less likely to have moderate to severe misalignment of the teeth. Breast-feeding six months or longer reduced their risk by 72 percent.

Read Also: CARIES : Does Breastfeeding Increase Risk of Early Childhood Caries?

The findings were published online June 15 in the journal Pediatrics. While the study found an association between breast-feeding and dental health, it did not prove a cause-and-effect link.

But Peres offered some possible explanations for the association.

“The plausible mechanisms which may explain the association between exclusive breast-feeding and lower risk of having [misaligned teeth or jaws] . . . include the adequate development of the orofacial structures in children who are breast-fed, such as proper muscular tone and nasal breathing,” Peres said. “In addition, children who are breast-fed are less likely to use a pacifier, which is considered a risk factor for malocclusion.”

Pierro explained it this way.

“Unlike feeding with a bottle, breast-feeding requires the baby to move her jaw and tongue in ways that help develop the oral cavity,” she said. “So long before baby breaks her first tooth, she is creating the foundation for proper alignment of the teeth.”

The findings may also reflect the effects of a baby getting regular jaw exercise through the act of breast-feeding, suggested Dr. Danelle Fisher, vice chair of pediatrics at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif.

“Breast-feeding requires the use of jaw muscles more so than bottle-feeding, so the mechanics of breast-feeding stimulate muscle tone in the jaw,” Fisher said.

Open bite, overbite and moderate to severe misalignment were generally less common overall among the children who mostly or exclusively breast-fed. Children who mostly breast-fed but also used pacifiers, however, were slightly more likely to have one of these misalignment issues, the study found.

“Pacifiers are used for non-nutritive sucking but when overused, they can put pressure on the developing jaw and lead to more problems in older children with malocclusion [teeth/jaw misalignment],” Fisher said.

That does not mean parents need to toss the pacifiers, however. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents consider using a pacifier for an infant’s first six months because pacifiers are associated with a reduced risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

“Most infants need to suck for comfort or non-nutritive sucking,” Fisher said. “Pacifiers can be helpful in the newborn period and even help reduce incidents of SIDS in infants who sleep with them.”

Instead, parents should simply limit pacifier use, she said. In addition, pacifiers are not needed past the first six to 12 months, Fisher said, so parents can begin weaning after that time.

news.health.com



ORAL MEDICINE : Clinical Management of Regional Odontodysplasia. Clinical Case

Oral Medicine

Regional odontodysplasia (ROD) is a relatively rare localized developmental anomaly of the dental tissues with specific clinical, radiographic, and histologic characteristics.

Crawford ascribed the first report of ROD to Hitchin in 1934, while others suggested that McCall and Wald were the first to describe this condition in 1947.

It was not until 1963, however, that Zegarelli et al coined the term “odontodysplasia” and Pindborg added the prefix “regional” in 1970.

In an extensive review of ROD in 1989, Crawford and Aldred stated females are more often affected than males (1.4:1) and that there was no association with race.

These authors listed several etiological factors such as local circulatory disorders, viral infections, pharmacotherapy during pregnancy, facial asymmetry, local trauma, metabolic disturbances, somatic and neural mutations, and syndromal involvement.

They also suggested that a combination of factors might be involved. In spite of this, ROD’s etiology remains undetermined.

Read Also: ORAL MEDICINE : How to treat oral thrush in newborns

The criteria for ROD diagnosis are based on clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings. The maxilla is typically affected twice as often as the mandible.

Clinically, the condition is usually unilateral and rarely crosses the midline; exceptions are, however, occasionally found. In most cases in which the damage crosses the midline, only the central incisor on the opposite side is affected.

The teeth are likely to be small, brown, grooved, and hypoplastic. Eruption failure or delay is frequently seen as well as abscesses or fistulae in the absence of caries.

Radiographically, there is a lack of contrast between the enamel and dentin, both of which are less radiopaque than unaffected counterparts.

Moreover, enamel and dentin layers are thin, giving the teeth a “ghost like” appearance. The pulp chambers are large, and usually present areas of relatively radiodense tissue (pulp stones or denticles). The follicles of unerupted teeth are enlarged.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° odontologiaparabebes.com
° Abel Cahuana, PhD, MD, DDS Yndira González, DDS Camila Palma, DDS



3/24/2020

What Are The Normal Ages For Teeth Falling Out?

Pediatric Dentistry

Many parents worry that their children’s teeth are not falling out on time. At what age should the first baby tooth be lost?

When should the last one fall out? Is there a predictable order?

The first baby teeth (also known as primary teeth) to come in are usually the lower central incisors around the age of six months.

The last baby teeth to show up are the upper second primary molars, and they appear between 30 and 36 months of age.


There are normally 20 baby teeth by the time a child reaches age 3. These primary teeth then remain unchanged for about three years.

Not much happens to the baby teeth between 3 and 6 years of age. Between 6 and 8 years however, there is a flurry of activity as kids normally lose eight primary teeth in rapid succession.

Read Also: The Importance of Oral Health during Pregnancy

Between age 8 and age 10 there is another two-year pause that catches many parents by surprise since they have become accustomed to teeth being lost left and right.

Although there are always exceptions, there is a basic sequence for the loss of the baby teeth. The upper and lower front four teeth are usually lost between the ages of 6 and 8. This typically begins around age 6 with the lower central incisors followed by the upper central incisors.


Youtube / Mastaj Orthodontics

3/20/2020

ORAL HEALTH : What type of dental work is safe to do during pregnancy?

Oral Health

In between trips to the doctor, hospital tours and setting up the nursery, don’t let visiting the dentist fall off your pregnancy to-do list before your baby comes.

Getting a checkup during pregnancy is safe and important for your dental health.

Not only can you take care of cleanings and procedures like cavity fillings before your baby is born, but your dentist can help you with any pregnancy-related dental symptoms you might be experiencing.


Even if you only think you might be pregnant, let your dental office know.

Tell them how far along you are when you make your appointment. Also let your dentist know about the medications you are taking or if you have received any special advice from your physician.

Read Also: PERIODONTICS : Gingivitis in Children and Adolescents

If your pregnancy is high-risk or if you have certain medical conditions, your dentist and your physician may recommend that some treatments be postponed.

Although many women make it nine months with no dental discomfort, pregnancy can make some conditions worse – or create new ones. Regular checkups and good dental health habits can help keep you and your baby healthy.


Youtube / Southeast Family Dental

How to treat chapped lips in a newborn

Babys-Chapped-Lips

Newborn babies sometimes get dry skin, and their lips may appear chapped as their skin adjusts to the environment outside the womb.

Several home remedies can help moisturize their lips and ease any discomfort.

It is common for a newborn's lips to appear more dry and red than an older baby's, but this is unlikely to cause any signs of pain or discomfort.

It may occasionally seem that chapped lips are uncomfortable for a newborn, but this symptom is not usually a cause for concern.


If a baby has chapped lips but seems comfortable and is feeding well, caregivers may choose to monitor them for other symptoms and mention it to their pediatrician at the next visit.

If chapped lips seem to bother a baby, caregivers can try out a range of gentle, effective home remedies to relieve this symptom.

Read Also: ORAL MEDICINE : How to manage a pediatric patient with oral ulcers

If other symptoms are also present, chapped lips can suggest an underlying condition, such as an infection or dehydration. If a newborn baby has chronic chapped lips or other symptoms, it is best to see a doctor to rule out any serious causes.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° medicalnewstoday.com
° By Bethany Cadman

3/15/2020

ORAL HYGIENE: Brushing a baby's teeth

Oral Hygiene

After weeks of watching your baby drool and fuss, you finally spot that first little tooth bud popping up through the gums.

Over the next couple of years, your baby's gummy smile will gradually be replaced by two rows of baby teeth.


Baby teeth may be small, but they're important.

They act as placeholders for adult teeth. Without a healthy set of baby teeth, your child will have trouble chewing and speaking clearly.

That's why caring for baby teeth and keeping them decay-free is so important.

Read Also: ORAL MEDICINE : Clinical Management of Regional Odontodysplasia. Clinical Case


Youtube / Sarah Tevis Poteet, DDS, PA

3/12/2020

ORAL HEALTH : Why does my young child keep having mouth ulcers ?

Mouth ulcers

Mouth ulcers are little sores that come up inside the mouth, on the tongue or on the gums. Mouth ulcers can be quite painful, but your child doesn’t usually need to see a doctor.

Mouth ulcers usually look like round, white sores on the inner lining of your child’s mouth, or on the surface of her gums or tongue.

These sores can be painful, especially when your child eats salty or spicy foods. Sometimes your child might even refuse food until the ulcers begin to heal.


If an infection is causing the ulcers, your child might also have a fever.

When to see a doctor about mouth ulcers

Read Also: Amelogenesis Imperfecta with Anterior Open Bite: A Rare Case Report

If you think your child might have ulcers related to a mouth infection, it’s a good idea to see your GP.

You should seek urgent medical advice if your child develops severe mouth ulcers with symptoms of general illness like: weight loss, tummy pain, unexplained fevers, blood or mucus in his poo, neck stiffness and tiredness, ulcers around his anus.


Youtube / NHS Choices

3/11/2020

PERIODONTICS : Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis in Preschoolers: Report of a case in a 3-1/2 Year Old

Periodontics

The importance of a prompt diagnosis and treatment of periodontitis in children is emphasized by the association between the presence of periodontitis in primary dentition and periodontitis at older ages in the same individual.

The 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions classified periodontal disease in children as follows:

°Dental plaque-induced gingival diseases; aggressive periodontitis (previously known as “prepubertal” or “early onset periodontitis”); chronic periodontitis; periodontitis as a manifestation of a systemic disease; and necrotizing periodontal diseases.


Aggressive and chronic periodontitis is subdivided into localized or generalized, depending on the size of the area affected. Most of the literature reports of severe periodontal destruction in children are associated with systemic diseases such as hypophosphatasia, cyclic neutropenia, agranulocytosis, histiocytosis X, leukocyte adhesion deficiency, Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome and leukemia.

Although destructive forms of periodontal disease in infants are relatively uncommon, children and adolescents may manifest any form of periodontitis. However, it has been shown that aggressive periodontitis may be more common in children and adolescents, while chronic periodontitis is more frequent in adults.

The etiology of aggressive periodontitis may be broadly divided into two categories: bacterial plaque with highly pathogenic bacteria, and impaired host defense mechanism.

Read Also: EMERGENCY : Managing Patients With Primary Incisor Root Fracture

As far as pathological microflora is concerned, the most important bacteria appear to be highly virulent strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans previously known as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in combination with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Treponema denticola, however other bacteria may be present.

Although there seems to be a genetic predisposition for periodontal diseases, it has also been shown that periodontopathic bacteria are transmissible among family members or between children and their caregivers.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


odontologiaparabebes.com
Camila Palma Portaro / Yndira Gonzalez Chópite / Abel Cahuana Cárdenas

3/02/2020

ORAL HEALTH : Oral, dental problems may be sign of child abuse, neglect

Oral Health

A new report by the American Academy of Pediatrics cautions that problems in a child's teeth, gums or mouth could be a sign of abuse or neglect.

Research from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry showed that injuries and infections in and around the mouth often appear in children who are abused or neglected.

Across the United States, healthcare providers, including dentists, are mandated to report any suspected cases of abuse or neglect to social service or law enforcement agencies.


The study, published in the August issue of Pediatrics, identified symptoms of possible abuse or neglect such as bruises on the lips, gums, tongue or soft tissue from forced feedings, burns or blisters from scalding liquids or fractures to teeth or facial bones from physical abuse.

Other injuries could include skin irritation, bruising or scarring at corners of the mouth, or bite marks.

Read Also: CARIES : Does Breastfeeding Increase Risk of Early Childhood Caries?

Untreated cavities and gum disease are also signs of neglect and can interfere with a child's ability to eat, communicate, grow and develop.

Researchers point out that it is important for healthcare providers to be able to recognize the symptoms of child abuse or neglect and be educated in what to do if they suspect abuse in one of their patients.

"Medical providers with experience or expertise in child abuse and neglect can make themselves available to dentists and dental organizations as consultants and educators," researchers wrote in the study.

"Such efforts will strengthen our ability to prevent and detect child abuse and neglect and enhance our ability to care for and protect children."

upi.com
By Amy Wallace

3/01/2020

ORAL HEALTH : Tongue tie

Tongue tie

Tongue-tie occurs when the thin piece of skin under the baby's tongue (the lingual frenulum) restricts the movement of the tongue.

In some cases the tongue is not free or mobile enough for the baby to attach properly to the breast.

Tongue-tie occurs in about 5% of people. It is three times more common in males than females and can run in families. Some babies with tongue-tie are able to attach to the breast and suck well.


However, many have breastfeeding problems, such as nipple damage, poor milk transfer and low weight gains in the baby, and recurrent blocked ducts or mastitis due to ineffective milk removal.

Read Also: Tips for Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

A baby needs to be able to cup the breast with his tongue to be able to remove milk from the breast well. If the tongue is anchored to the floor of the mouth, the baby cannot do this as well.

The baby may not be able to open his mouth wide enough to take in a full mouthful of breast tissue.


Youtube / Bernadette Bos

2/27/2020

ORAL MEDICINE : Oral Manifestations in Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Report of Five Cases

Oral Medicine

Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, or chondroectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic clinical manifestations.

Its incidence in the general population is low. The oral manifestations of Ellis-van Creveld are found in soft tissues and teeth, but the dental literature on the subject is scarce.

In the last 20 years, 5 cases of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome have been followed at the Pediatric Dentistry Service of the Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona.


The present study describes the constant and variable oral findings in these patients, which play an important role in the diagnosis criteria for the syndrome.

The presence of a great variety of oral manifestations such as fusion of the upper lip to the gingival margin, presence of multiple frenula, abnormally shaped and microdontic teeth, and congenitally missing teeth requires multidisciplinary dental treatment, with consideration for the high incidence of cardiac defects in these patients.

Read Also: What Is PREGNANCY GINGIVITIS?

Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is an autosomal recessive chondroectodermal dysplasia, described by Richard Ellis and Simon van Creveld in 1940.

The syndrome had been partially described earlier in several reports, but it was Ellis and van Creveld’s work that defined it. EvC is a generalized dysplasia of endochondral ossification caused by mutations in a novel gene on chromosome 4p16, EVC.

Heterozygous carriers of these mutations do not exhibit manifestations of the disorder.

Recently, a second gene that gives rise to the same phenotype of the syndrome has been identified, and named EVC2.12 Affected individuals with mutations in EVC or EVC2 have the typical spectrum of features and are phenotypically indistinguishable.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


odontologiaparabebes.com
Abel Cahuana, PhD, MD, DDS / Camila Palma, DDS / Wilber Gonzáles, DDS / Esther Geán, MD