Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Oral Medicine. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Oral Medicine. Mostrar todas las entradas

4/14/2020

CLINICAL CASE : Brain abscess secondary to a dental infection in an 11 year old child

Clinical Case

A primary molar dental abscess was implicated as the cause of a brain abscess in an 11-year-old boy.

This case report describes the neurological signs and symptoms, and acute management of a brain abscess in a child.

A brain abscess is provisionally diagnosed from the patient’s medical history, as well as the presence of signs and symptoms such as fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, focal neurological deficit, altered mentation, speech alterations, papillary edema, and neck stiffness or seizures.


A definitive diagnosis of brain abscess is confirmed through imaging.

The dental source of infection is identified by the exclusion of more probable foci such as the ears, heart, lungs, eyes or sinuses.

Read Also: EMERGENCY : Multidisciplinary approach in the immediate replantation of a maxillary central incisor

Introduction : Dental abscesses and facial cellulitis put dentists on alert for potentially life-threatening conditions such as sepsis or airway obstruction, but the risk of a brain abscess is a complication of odontogenic infection that dentists rarely consider.

This report describes the case of an 11-year-old boy whose brain abscess and associated neurological signs were most likely attributable to an abscessed primary molar.

The description of the neurological signs and symptoms, and the history and management of this case will inform dentists about the real possibility of a brain abscess of dental origin.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°jcda.ca
°Canadian Dental Association
°Dr. Hibberd / Dr. Nguyen

4/05/2020

ORAL PATHOLOGY : Congenital epulis with auto-resolution: case report

Congenital epulis

Congenital epulis is an uncommon benign lesion that affects the oral cavity of newborns, and presents histological features which are similar to those of granular cell tumor.

The origin of this lesion has not been fully elucidated, and many hypotheses are considered due to the large variety of cell types observed in histological sections.

Epulis development occurs further in the prenatal period, and is more common in newborn females, frequently in the maxilla.



This lesion usually is presentend as a nodule covered by normal oral mucosa, which in some cases, interferes with baby's breathing and feeding.

This report describes the case of a two-month-old male baby who presented a pedunculated intraoral lesion in the mandibular alveolar ridge.

Read Also: Reimplantation of avulsed dry permanent teeth after three days

Histological sections revealed presence of mucosal fragments with atrophic squamous stratified epithelium, and fibrous connective tissue composed of cells with granular and eosinophilic cytoplasm.

A few days after initial exam, the lesion detached from alveolar ridge, and healed spontaneously.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° Adriane Sousa de SIQUEIRA, Márcia Regina Dias de CARVALHO, Ana Celina Dourado MONTEIRO, Maria das Graças Rodrigues PINHEIRO, Lucas Rodrigues PINHEIRO, João de Jesus Viana PINHEIRO



4/03/2020

Deformity of the tongue in an infant: Riga-Fede disease

Dental Emergency

Riga-Fede is the rare condition of benign ulceration caused by repeti-tive trauma to the lingual tissues by the teeth in children younger than two years of age.

The differential diagnosis includes infective and neoplastic conditions.

Histological diagnosis is required when the symptoms fail to resolve with standard management.

The case involv-ing an 11-month-old girl who presented with ulceration of the tongue, resulting in a reasonable defect of the tongue tip, is reported in the present article.

Read Also: Idiopathic Gingival Hyperplasia: A Case Report with a 17-Year Followup

Following excisional biopsy, the lesion healed without subsequent recurrence.

Riga-Fede disease should be consid-ered in infants presenting with oral ulceration. Extraction of the offending teeth should be considered when associated with failure to thrive or failed conservative management.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°researchgate.net
°Karen A Eley / Pauline A Watt-Smith / Stephen R Watt-Smith



ORAL PATHOLOGY : Dental Anomalies in Children

oral pathology

Human dentitions are subject to considerable variation in size, form, number of teeth and to the structure of the dental tissues.

Disorders of the development of teeth may be inheritedor acquired.

The primary dentition begins to form at approximately six weeks in utero and the permanent dentition continues through late adolescence.

The dentition is thereforesusceptible to environmental influencesfor many years.

Diagnosing abnormal dental development requires thorough evaluation of the patient, including a medical, dental and family history, clinical examination, and radiographic evaluation and, in some cases, special laboratory tests are also required.

Read Also: ORTHODONTIC : Malocclusion in Down syndrome - a review

Genetic consultation is important not merely to put a name to the condition, but also to give appropriate advice on the prognosis and the risk of recurrence in future generations.

It is impossible, in the context of this article, to describe in detail all dental anomalies that occur in children.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


Jinous F Tahmassebi / Peter F Day / Kyriacos Jack Toumba



4/02/2020

An Interdisciplinary Approach for Rehabilitating a Patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report

Amelogenesis Imperfecta

Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) has been defined as a group of hereditary enamel defects. It can be characterized by enamel hypoplasia, hypomaturation, or hypocalcification of the teeth.

AI may be associated with some other dental and skeletal developmental defects. Restoration for patients with this condition should be oriented toward the functional and esthetic rehabilitation.

This clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of a young patient diagnosed with the hypoplastic type of AI in posterior teeth and hypomatured type of AI in anterior teeth.

Introduction : Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a diverse group of hereditary disorders that primarily affect the quantity, structure, and composition of enamel. The inheritance pattern of AI may be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked.

Read Also: Clinical Management of Regional Odontodysplasia. Clinical Case

According to the Witkop classification system, there are four main forms of AI: type I hypoplastic enamel, type II hypomatured enamel, type III hypocalcified enamel, and type IV hypomatured-hypoplastic enamel with taurodontism.

Clinical presentation of AI varies considerably among the different AI types. In the hypomature type, the affected teeth exhibit mottled, opaque white-brown or yellow discolored enamel, which is softer than normal.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° hindawi.com
° Niloufar Khodaeian / Mahmoud Sabouhi / Ebrahim Ataei



3/31/2020

ORAL MEDICINE : How to treat oral thrush in newborns

Oral Thrush

Thrush is an infection caused by a yeast germ called Candida. The mouth is a common site where Candida causes infection. Candidal infection in the mouth is called oral thrush.

Other common sites for thrush to develop are the vagina, nappy area, and nail folds.

Small numbers of Candida organisms commonly live on healthy skin and in a healthy mouth.

They are usually harmless. However, an overgrowth of Candida can occur in the mouth of some babies. This can cause a bout of oral thrush.

This overgrowth may happen because the baby's immune system is still quite immature and so it cannot control the Candida levels.

You may also like ORAL PATHOLOGY : Residual Neonatal Teeth: A Case Report

Another possible cause for oral thrush infection is if your baby has had a recent course of antibiotic medication.

This is because the antibiotics can kill off healthy germs (bacteria) that live in your baby's mouth. These healthy bacteria normally help to control the levels of Candida in your baby's mouth.

If there are fewer healthy bacteria around, candidal overgrowth can occur. Also, if you are breast-feeding and you have recently been on antibiotics yourself, the levels of your healthy bacteria can be affected. This can make you, or your baby, more likely to develop thrush.


Youtube / ehowhealth



3/30/2020

ORAL MEDICINE : How to manage a pediatric patient with oral ulcers

Oral Medicine

Oral ulcers are a common clinical problem in the pediatric population.

Generally, an ulcer is defined as a well-circumscribed lesion with an epithelial defect covered by a fibrin clot (a pseudomembrane), giving the ulcer a yellow-white appearance.

Presentation : Population

a. Any segment of the pediatric population, from infancy through adolescence

b. Children of parents with recurrent oral ulcers due to genetic predisposition (i.e., recurrent aphthous stomatitis)

c. Young children in group settings (e.g., daycare, shared play areas) developing oral ulcers secondary to an infectious (i.e., bacterial and/or viral) etiology due to the increased risk of oral fluid transfer in those settings

Read Also: ORAL PATHOLOGY : Dental Anomalies in Children

Signs

a. Well-circumscribed lesions, often depressed, with an epithelial defect covered by a yellow-white pseudomembrane

b. Single or multiple ulcers; may present in clusters (herpetiform)

c. Intraoral/perioral location: nonkeratinized and/or keratinized oral mucosa, oropharynx, lips, perioral skin

d. Variable size (most commonly measured in millimetres, but may be larger)

e. General location: oral/perioral lesion(s) only or with involvement of other affected surfaces (i.e., skin, genitals, other mucous membranes)

Symptoms

a. Pain severity: Can range from asymptomatic to severe discomfort

b. Burning

c. Irritation

d. Pruritis (itching sensation)

e. Systemic symptoms, such as fever, malaise, lymphadenopathy, difficulty swallowing and general irritability

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°jcda.ca
°Canadian Dental Association
°Eric T. Stoopler, DMD, FDS RCSEd / Ghada Al Zamel, DDS