Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Oral Hygiene. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Oral Hygiene. Mostrar todas las entradas

4/14/2020

ORAL HYGIENE : How to Clean a Baby's Gums

Oral Hygiene

The road to your baby's first birthday is full of milestones, from solid foods to first steps.

But it's the most picture-worthy milestone – your child's first smile – that reflects the importance of good oral health even before his or her baby teeth erupt.

Even before your baby sports his first tooth, it's a good idea to get into the habit of wiping his gums with gauze or a soft wet washcloth during bath time.



You don't need to use any toothpaste yet. Simply wrap the cloth or gauze around your index finger and rub it gently over his gums.

Bacteria in the mouth usually can't harm the gums before the teeth emerge, but it can be hard to tell when the teeth are starting to push through, so you'll want to start early.

Getting your baby used to having his mouth cleaned as part of his daily routine should make it easier to transition into toothbrushing later on, too.

Read Also: ORAL HYGIENE: Brushing a baby's teeth

Although clamp and scissors are used in this video, alternatively, a laser can also be used. Keep in mind, video is for release and NOT frenulectomy.


Youtube / Howcast



3/31/2020

ORAL HYGIENE : How to prevent tooth decay in children?

Oral Hygiene

Tooth decay, also known as dental cavities or caries, is the most common dental problem amongst children.

It can cause painful holes (cavities) in your teeth.

Cavities usually need to be drilled and then filled to keep the tooth decay from getting worse.

But doing certain things can help to prevent the need for treatment in the first place.

The most effective way to prevent tooth decay is by regularly brushing your teeth and strengthening them with fluoride.

Sticking to a healthy diet and not eating too much candy or sweets is also good for your teeth. Last but not least, dental check-ups can help detect and treat tooth decay early on.

Read Also: What is Early Childhood Caries ?

Tooth decay is mainly caused by bacteria in the plaque that coats your teeth, and by too much sugar in your diet.

So limiting your consumption of sugary foods, drinks, candies and gum is one way to prevent tooth decay.

Eating sweet things every once in a while is perfectly fine, though, as long as you still take good care of your teeth.


Youtube / Doctors' Circle - Ask Doctors. Free Video Answers



3/24/2020

What Are The Normal Ages For Teeth Falling Out?

Pediatric Dentistry

Many parents worry that their children’s teeth are not falling out on time. At what age should the first baby tooth be lost?

When should the last one fall out? Is there a predictable order?

The first baby teeth (also known as primary teeth) to come in are usually the lower central incisors around the age of six months.

The last baby teeth to show up are the upper second primary molars, and they appear between 30 and 36 months of age.


There are normally 20 baby teeth by the time a child reaches age 3. These primary teeth then remain unchanged for about three years.

Not much happens to the baby teeth between 3 and 6 years of age. Between 6 and 8 years however, there is a flurry of activity as kids normally lose eight primary teeth in rapid succession.

Read Also: The Importance of Oral Health during Pregnancy

Between age 8 and age 10 there is another two-year pause that catches many parents by surprise since they have become accustomed to teeth being lost left and right.

Although there are always exceptions, there is a basic sequence for the loss of the baby teeth. The upper and lower front four teeth are usually lost between the ages of 6 and 8. This typically begins around age 6 with the lower central incisors followed by the upper central incisors.


Youtube / Mastaj Orthodontics

3/20/2020

ORAL HEALTH : What type of dental work is safe to do during pregnancy?

Oral Health

In between trips to the doctor, hospital tours and setting up the nursery, don’t let visiting the dentist fall off your pregnancy to-do list before your baby comes.

Getting a checkup during pregnancy is safe and important for your dental health.

Not only can you take care of cleanings and procedures like cavity fillings before your baby is born, but your dentist can help you with any pregnancy-related dental symptoms you might be experiencing.


Even if you only think you might be pregnant, let your dental office know.

Tell them how far along you are when you make your appointment. Also let your dentist know about the medications you are taking or if you have received any special advice from your physician.

Read Also: PERIODONTICS : Gingivitis in Children and Adolescents

If your pregnancy is high-risk or if you have certain medical conditions, your dentist and your physician may recommend that some treatments be postponed.

Although many women make it nine months with no dental discomfort, pregnancy can make some conditions worse – or create new ones. Regular checkups and good dental health habits can help keep you and your baby healthy.


Youtube / Southeast Family Dental

3/15/2020

ORAL HYGIENE: Brushing a baby's teeth

Oral Hygiene

After weeks of watching your baby drool and fuss, you finally spot that first little tooth bud popping up through the gums.

Over the next couple of years, your baby's gummy smile will gradually be replaced by two rows of baby teeth.


Baby teeth may be small, but they're important.

They act as placeholders for adult teeth. Without a healthy set of baby teeth, your child will have trouble chewing and speaking clearly.

That's why caring for baby teeth and keeping them decay-free is so important.

Read Also: ORAL MEDICINE : Clinical Management of Regional Odontodysplasia. Clinical Case


Youtube / Sarah Tevis Poteet, DDS, PA

3/01/2020

ORAL HEALTH : Tongue tie

Tongue tie

Tongue-tie occurs when the thin piece of skin under the baby's tongue (the lingual frenulum) restricts the movement of the tongue.

In some cases the tongue is not free or mobile enough for the baby to attach properly to the breast.

Tongue-tie occurs in about 5% of people. It is three times more common in males than females and can run in families. Some babies with tongue-tie are able to attach to the breast and suck well.


However, many have breastfeeding problems, such as nipple damage, poor milk transfer and low weight gains in the baby, and recurrent blocked ducts or mastitis due to ineffective milk removal.

Read Also: Tips for Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

A baby needs to be able to cup the breast with his tongue to be able to remove milk from the breast well. If the tongue is anchored to the floor of the mouth, the baby cannot do this as well.

The baby may not be able to open his mouth wide enough to take in a full mouthful of breast tissue.


Youtube / Bernadette Bos

2/23/2020

TOOTH DECAY: How to prevent baby bottle tooth decay

Tooth Decay

Tooth decay in infants and very young children is often referred to as baby bottle tooth decay.

Baby bottle tooth decay happens when sweetened liquids or those with natural sugars (like milk, formula, and fruit juice) cling to an infant's teeth for a long time. Bacteria in the mouth thrive on this sugar and make acids that attack the teeth.

At risk are children whose pacifiers are frequently dipped in sugar or syrup.


Giving an infant a sugary drink at nap time or nighttime is particularly harmful because the flow of saliva decreases during sleep.

Although baby bottle tooth decay typically happens in the upper front teeth, other teeth may also be affected.

Read Also: The Importance of Oral Health during Pregnancy

Think baby teeth are temporary, and therefore, not important? Think again. Baby teeth are necessary for chewing, speaking, and smiling. They also serve as placeholders for the adult teeth.

If baby bottle tooth decay is left untreated, pain and infection can result. Severely decayed teeth may need to be removed.


Youtube / Diario de Pernambuco