Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Clinical Case. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Clinical Case. Mostrar todas las entradas

4/14/2020

CLINICAL CASE : Brain abscess secondary to a dental infection in an 11 year old child

Clinical Case

A primary molar dental abscess was implicated as the cause of a brain abscess in an 11-year-old boy.

This case report describes the neurological signs and symptoms, and acute management of a brain abscess in a child.

A brain abscess is provisionally diagnosed from the patient’s medical history, as well as the presence of signs and symptoms such as fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, focal neurological deficit, altered mentation, speech alterations, papillary edema, and neck stiffness or seizures.


A definitive diagnosis of brain abscess is confirmed through imaging.

The dental source of infection is identified by the exclusion of more probable foci such as the ears, heart, lungs, eyes or sinuses.

Read Also: EMERGENCY : Multidisciplinary approach in the immediate replantation of a maxillary central incisor

Introduction : Dental abscesses and facial cellulitis put dentists on alert for potentially life-threatening conditions such as sepsis or airway obstruction, but the risk of a brain abscess is a complication of odontogenic infection that dentists rarely consider.

This report describes the case of an 11-year-old boy whose brain abscess and associated neurological signs were most likely attributable to an abscessed primary molar.

The description of the neurological signs and symptoms, and the history and management of this case will inform dentists about the real possibility of a brain abscess of dental origin.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°jcda.ca
°Canadian Dental Association
°Dr. Hibberd / Dr. Nguyen

4/05/2020

ORAL PATHOLOGY : Congenital epulis with auto-resolution: case report

Congenital epulis

Congenital epulis is an uncommon benign lesion that affects the oral cavity of newborns, and presents histological features which are similar to those of granular cell tumor.

The origin of this lesion has not been fully elucidated, and many hypotheses are considered due to the large variety of cell types observed in histological sections.

Epulis development occurs further in the prenatal period, and is more common in newborn females, frequently in the maxilla.



This lesion usually is presentend as a nodule covered by normal oral mucosa, which in some cases, interferes with baby's breathing and feeding.

This report describes the case of a two-month-old male baby who presented a pedunculated intraoral lesion in the mandibular alveolar ridge.

Read Also: Reimplantation of avulsed dry permanent teeth after three days

Histological sections revealed presence of mucosal fragments with atrophic squamous stratified epithelium, and fibrous connective tissue composed of cells with granular and eosinophilic cytoplasm.

A few days after initial exam, the lesion detached from alveolar ridge, and healed spontaneously.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° Adriane Sousa de SIQUEIRA, Márcia Regina Dias de CARVALHO, Ana Celina Dourado MONTEIRO, Maria das Graças Rodrigues PINHEIRO, Lucas Rodrigues PINHEIRO, João de Jesus Viana PINHEIRO



3/30/2020

ORAL MEDICINE : Clinical Management of Regional Odontodysplasia. Clinical Case

Oral Medicine

Regional odontodysplasia (ROD) is a relatively rare localized developmental anomaly of the dental tissues with specific clinical, radiographic, and histologic characteristics.

Crawford ascribed the first report of ROD to Hitchin in 1934, while others suggested that McCall and Wald were the first to describe this condition in 1947.

It was not until 1963, however, that Zegarelli et al coined the term “odontodysplasia” and Pindborg added the prefix “regional” in 1970.

In an extensive review of ROD in 1989, Crawford and Aldred stated females are more often affected than males (1.4:1) and that there was no association with race.

These authors listed several etiological factors such as local circulatory disorders, viral infections, pharmacotherapy during pregnancy, facial asymmetry, local trauma, metabolic disturbances, somatic and neural mutations, and syndromal involvement.

They also suggested that a combination of factors might be involved. In spite of this, ROD’s etiology remains undetermined.

Read Also: ORAL MEDICINE : How to treat oral thrush in newborns

The criteria for ROD diagnosis are based on clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings. The maxilla is typically affected twice as often as the mandible.

Clinically, the condition is usually unilateral and rarely crosses the midline; exceptions are, however, occasionally found. In most cases in which the damage crosses the midline, only the central incisor on the opposite side is affected.

The teeth are likely to be small, brown, grooved, and hypoplastic. Eruption failure or delay is frequently seen as well as abscesses or fistulae in the absence of caries.

Radiographically, there is a lack of contrast between the enamel and dentin, both of which are less radiopaque than unaffected counterparts.

Moreover, enamel and dentin layers are thin, giving the teeth a “ghost like” appearance. The pulp chambers are large, and usually present areas of relatively radiodense tissue (pulp stones or denticles). The follicles of unerupted teeth are enlarged.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


° odontologiaparabebes.com
° Abel Cahuana, PhD, MD, DDS Yndira González, DDS Camila Palma, DDS



3/20/2020

CLINICAL CASE : 26 Month old child with severe child hood caries

Dental Caries

Dental caries (decay) is an international public health challenge, especially amongst young children.

Early childhood caries (ECC) is a serious public health problem in both developing and industrialized countries.

ECC can begin early in life, progresses rapidly in those who are at high risk, and often goes untreated.


Its consequences can affect the immediate and long-term quality of life of the child's family and can have significant social and economic consequences beyond the immediate family as well.

ECC can be a particularly virulent form of caries, beginning soon after dental eruption, developing on smooth surfaces, progressing rapidly, and having a lasting detrimental impact on the dentition.

Read Also: ORAL PATHOLOGY : Residual Neonatal Teeth: A Case Report




Youtube / Ahmed ElNassry
Image : NZ Herald

3/15/2020

EMERGENCY : Reimplantation of avulsed dry permanent teeth after three days

Emergency

Avulsion is a traumatic injury which results in loss of the tooth from the alveolus, while reimplantation is the technique of reinserting an avulsed tooth into the alveolus or tooth socket after its loss.

The success of reimplantation depends on many factors among which are the time lapse before the tooth is reimplanted in the socket and the storage medium of the avulsed tooth.


Other factors which may affect the success of reimplantation include the condition of the tooth, particularly the periodontal ligament tissue remaining on the root surface, sex, age, type of tooth reimplanted, stage of root formation, type of cleansing procedure following contamination of the root surface, duration of splinting, and the use of antibiotics.

With favorable conditions such as the periodontal ligament remaining on the root surface, the tooth stored in adequate storage medium for not more than 60 minutes, and immediate reimplantation after the accident, the tooth may be retained for as long as 5 to 10 years and few for a lifetime, but some fail soon after reimplantation.

Read Also: ORAL SURGERY : Guideline on Pediatric Oral Surgery

Unfavorable conditions include teeth out of the mouth for more than 6 hours in no storage media and without periodontal ligament on the root surface.

In such cases, the reimplanted tooth fails with subsequent loss of the tooth.

This is because dry storage affects pulp revascularization and survival of the periodontal ligament cells along the root surface resulting in either replacement resorption or loss of the tooth.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°njcponline.com
°Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice
°IN Ize-Iyamu, BDO Saheeb

3/13/2020

ORTHODONTIC : Pseudo class III treatment in 2-year-old children

Orthodontic

Timing of orthodontic treatment especially for children with developing Class III malocclusions has always been somewhat controversial.

Pseudo class III malocclusion is recommended to be treated early as this type of malocclusion doesn’t diminish with age.

Untreated pseudo class III may lead to serious problems. The case report describes pseudo class III in primary dentition successfully treated by using Protrusive Arch Wire.


INTRODUCTION : Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial.

The earlier the interceptive phase is initiated, the greater the orthopedic effects will be to the detriment of the unavoidable orthodontic and orthopedic effects.

Read Also: ORTHODONTIC : Guiding Unerupted Teeth into Occlusion: Case Report

Esthetics for the child implies the improved self-esteem considering the psychological factor.

The diagnosis of pseudo class III malocclusion differs from that of skeletal class III malocclusion because it is defined as functional forward displacement of the mandible as a result of retroclined maxillary incisors.

The aim of early treatment of this type of malocclusion is to correct pseudo class III, otherwise it can lead to serious class III mallocclusion which would be possible to treat only with combined orthodontic and orthognatic method.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


Open Journal of Stomatology
Maen Mahfouz

3/11/2020

ORAL SURGERY : Conservative treatment of the dentigerous cyst: report of two cases in childrens

Dentigerous Cyst

The purpose of this paper is to present two cases of dentigerous cyst associated to permanent teeth in children treated by conservative techniques.

Dentigerous cyst is the most common developmental cysts of the jaws.

Conservative treatment is very effective to this entity and aims at eliminating the cystic tissue and preserving the permanent tooth involved in the pathology.


Two techniques are described as conservative treatment for these cysts, marsupialization and the decompression. Two children presented with dentigerous cysts.

A female child was affected by a large lesion at the right side of the mandible associated to tooth 45. The other lesion arose at the left maxilla associated to tooth 21 of a male child. Each dentigerous cyst promoted severe tooth displacement.

The first patient was treated with decompression and the second with marsupialization.

Read Also: ORAL SURGERY : Guideline on Pediatric Oral Surgery

Introduction

Dentigerous cyst is the most common odontogenic development cyst. It can involve any included tooth, although molars and canines are the most affected ones. Cystic formation involving the crown of premolars and incisives is rare.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


°Brazilian Journal of Oral Sciences
°Manoela Carrera; Danilo Borges Dantas; Antônio Mareio Marchionni; Marília Gerhardt de Oliveira; Miguel Gustavo Setúbal Andrade