Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Baby bottle tooth decay. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Baby bottle tooth decay. Mostrar todas las entradas

3/01/2020

Tips for Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Prevention

Even though they are temporary, your child's baby teeth are important, and are still susceptible to cavities.

Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or Early Childhood Caries. Children need strong, healthy teeth to chew their food, speak and have a good-looking smile.

Their first teeth also help make sure their adult teeth come in correctly. It’s important to start infants off with good oral care to help protect their teeth for decades to come.


Baby Bottle Tooth Decay most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected.

There are many factors which can cause tooth decay. One common cause is the frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar.

Read Also: What is Early Childhood Caries ?

Tooth decay can occur when the baby is put to bed with a bottle, or when a bottle is used as a pacifier for a fussy baby.

Tooth decay is a disease that can begin with cavity-causing bacteria being passed from the mother (or primary caregiver) to the infant. These bacteria are passed through the saliva.


Youtube / Nicklaus Children's Hospital

2/23/2020

TOOTH DECAY: How to prevent baby bottle tooth decay

Tooth Decay

Tooth decay in infants and very young children is often referred to as baby bottle tooth decay.

Baby bottle tooth decay happens when sweetened liquids or those with natural sugars (like milk, formula, and fruit juice) cling to an infant's teeth for a long time. Bacteria in the mouth thrive on this sugar and make acids that attack the teeth.

At risk are children whose pacifiers are frequently dipped in sugar or syrup.


Giving an infant a sugary drink at nap time or nighttime is particularly harmful because the flow of saliva decreases during sleep.

Although baby bottle tooth decay typically happens in the upper front teeth, other teeth may also be affected.

Read Also: The Importance of Oral Health during Pregnancy

Think baby teeth are temporary, and therefore, not important? Think again. Baby teeth are necessary for chewing, speaking, and smiling. They also serve as placeholders for the adult teeth.

If baby bottle tooth decay is left untreated, pain and infection can result. Severely decayed teeth may need to be removed.


Youtube / Diario de Pernambuco

2/15/2020

Baby Bottle TOOTH DECAY : Causes and Prevention

Tooth Decay

Even though they are temporary, your child's baby teeth are important, and are still susceptible to cavities.

Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or Early Childhood Caries.

Children need strong, healthy teeth to chew their food, speak and have a good-looking smile.


Their first teeth also help make sure their adult teeth come in correctly.

It’s important to start infants off with good oral care to help protect their teeth for decades to come.

► Read Also:

° Atraumatic Restorative Treatment : step-by-step
° ORAL HEALTH : What Is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected.

There are many factors which can cause tooth decay. One common cause is the frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar.

Tooth decay can occur when the baby is put to bed with a bottle, or when a bottle is used as a pacifier for a fussy baby.


Youtube / South Dental

2/10/2020

ORAL HEALTH : What Is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

Oral Health

Tooth decay in infants and very young children is often referred to as baby bottle tooth decay.

Baby bottle tooth decay happens when sweetened liquids or those with natural sugars (like milk, formula, and fruit juice) cling to an infant's teeth for a long time.

Bacteria in the mouth thrive on this sugar and make acids that attack the teeth. At risk are children whose pacifiers are frequently dipped in sugar or syrup.


Giving an infant a sugary drink at nap time or nighttime is particularity harmful, as the flow of saliva decreases during sleep.

Although baby bottle tooth decay typically happens in the upper front teeth, other teeth may also be affected.

Think baby teeth are temporary, and therefore, not important? Think again. Baby teeth are necessary for chewing, speaking, and smiling.

Read Also: Oral health and pregnancy

They also serve as placeholders for the adult teeth. If baby bottle tooth decay is left untreated, pain and infection can result. Severely decayed teeth may need to be removed.

If teeth are infected or lost too early due to baby bottle tooth decay, your child may develop poor eating habits, speech problems, crooked teeth, and damaged adult teeth. In addition, the chances that adult teeth will end up being crooked are greatly increased.

The good news is that a few simple steps can help stave off baby bottle tooth decay.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE


webmd.com

4/27/2019

CARIES : Does Breastfeeding Increase Risk of Early Childhood Caries?

Dental Caries

A long-held view in dentistry that breastfeeding, compared to other types of infant feeding, can contribute to early childhood caries (ECC) may have left some dentists feeling unsure about the implications of breastfeeding on infant oral health.

CDA’s new position statement on breastfeeding clarifies this issue for dentists and their patients by recognizing breastfeeding as just “one of many risk factors that may contribute to the development of dental caries.”

In noting that “it is vital that mouth cleaning or tooth brushing be part of the daily routine for all infants, including those that are breastfed,” the CDA position statement recognizes that oral hygiene—not breastfeeding—may be the most important factor influencing caries development in infants.


The idea that breastfeeding—especially breastfeeding on demand at night—can lead to an increased risk of early childhood caries (ECC) has concerned the dental community since it was first raised in the literature in 1977.

Kotlow presented case reports of clinical observations suggesting that breastfeeding on demand may be associated with ECC, defined as the presence of one or more decayed (noncavitated or cavitated lesions), missing (due to caries) or filled tooth surfaces in any primary tooth in children under age 6.

Since then, these concerns have been validated by leading health organizations. The American Dental Association’s Statement on Early Childhood Caries states that “Unrestricted, at-will nocturnal breastfeeding after eruption of the child's first tooth can lead to an increased risk of caries.”

Read Also: EMERGENCY : Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II: approach for dental treatment

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Policy on Early Childhood Caries (ECC): Classifications, Consequences, and Preventive Strategies4 recommends that “Ad libitum breast-feeding should be avoided after the first primary tooth begins to erupt and other dietary carbohydrates are introduced.”

Yet the belief that breastfeeding can cause ECC, through either the properties of human milk or the practice of breastfeeding, is not backed by current scientific evidence.

A recent report in the Journal of the American Dental Association5 reviews the oral health outcomes associated with breastfeeding and cites a 2008 systematic review that concluded, “scientifically rigorous research is needed to elucidate whether associations exist between breastfeeding and ECC, and such evidence is lacking.”

jcda.ca

7/16/2018

Does CARIES in childhood mean caries in adult teeth also?


In the last three decades, a significant decrease in caries prevalence has been observed, especially in developed countries.

However, Early Childhood Caries (ECC) continues to be a crucial public health problem in the deprived communities with low economic standards.

ECC is an acute, rapidly developing dental disease occurring initially in the cervical third of the maxillary incisors, and eventually destroying the crown completely.

Early onset and rampant clinical progression make ECC a serious public health problem.

Due to varying clinical, etiological, localization, and prognostic features, this pathology is found under different names such as, labial caries (LC), caries of the incisors, nursing bottle mouth, rampant caries (RC), nursing bottle caries (NBC), nursing caries, baby bottle tooth decay (BBTD), early childhood caries (ECC), rampant infant and early childhood dental decay, and severe early childhood caries (SECC).

Generally, ECC affects the maxillary primary incisors immediately after the eruption of teeth and spreads over the other primary teeth quickly, causing early tooth lost.

Despite a few confusing results, the children who develop caries at an early age run a high risk of further caries development in the primary dentition, and are more likely to develop caries in the permanent dentition.


This foresight may be a vital advantage in determining the patients at a high risk of caries, and in advising the individual on special preventive practices in early ages.

This is especially true in our country, which has a substantial rural area without any established and economical dental system.

The children with caries in the early primary dentition develop significantly more lesions on the permanent teeth, especially the first molars, compared to caries-free children of the same age group.

Children with ECC also have a much greater probability of subsequent dental caries, both in the primary and in the permanent dentitions.

Read Also : PREVENTION : Fluoride varnish application and oral hygiene instruction


Youtube / Doctors' Circle - Ask Doctors. Free Video Answers