10/06/2019

Benign Migratory Glossitis: Report of a Rare Case with Review of Literature

Oral Medicine

Benign migratory glossitis or geographic tongue is an inflammatory lesion of unknown etiology and is characterized by loss of filiform papillae.

Asymptomatic cases are more commonly seen, but symptomatic cases in children are rarely found.

The aim of this paper is to report an uncommon case of symptomatic geographic tongue in a 3-year old male with a history of asthma and allergy and emphasize the importance of thorough intraoral examination to identify the condition and also to briefly review the literature.


Introduction : Benign migratory glossitis or geographic tongue is a psoriasiform mucositis of the dorsum of the tongue.

It is a benign inflammatory disorder and was first reported by Rayer. It is more common in adults as compared to children. It is characterized by constantly changing patterns of serpiginous white lines surrounding areas of smooth, depapillated mucosa.

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Erythematous patches, devoid of filiform papillae, appear on the dorsum of tongue. White border is present which represents regenerating filiform papillae, keratin and neutrophils.

The surface is non-ulcerated. The lesions have slightly raised, well developed white margins which could not be scraped off. Change in the location and pattern of lesion is observed after every few days, thereby giving it name “migratory”.

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° pdfs.semanticscholar.org
° Mehta V (2017) Benign Migratory Glossitis: Report of a Rare Case with Review of Literature. J Dent Health Oral Disord Ther 6(4): 00210. DOI: 10.15406/jdhodt.2017.06.00210


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