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Ludwig’s Angina: A Case Report

Ludwig’s Angina

Ludwig’s angina is a serious, a rapidly progressive cellulitis of the floor of the mouth which, involves the submandibular, submaxillary, and sublingual spaces of the face, it is life threatening if not early recognised and complications like septicemia and asphyxia caused by expanding edema of soft tissues of the neck may occur.

A 11-year-old boy referred to, our clinic had tender swelling of the floor of his mouth.

Based on his history and symptoms, the diagnosis of Ludwig’s angina was suspected. Infected teeth were diagnosed in oral and radiological examination.


The child was treated appropriately by extraction of infected teeth after antibiotic therapy. Many departments may have limited experience of the disease because of its rare occurrence.

So, it is important to recognize Ludwig's angina in the earlier stages of the disease.

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Introduction

Ludwig’s angina was firstly described by Wilhelm Fredrick von Ludwig in 1836. Ludwig’s angina is a serious, life threatening if not early recognised and treated due to septicemia and asphyxia caused by expanding edema of soft tissues of the neck.

Ludwig's angina has been occurred more usually in adults than children. Death from thi infection is approximately 10% to 17% in the pediatric population.

Conventionally, Ludwig’s angina has been more seen in patiente with poor oral hygiene. Most of the cases are due to infected lower molars or pericoronitis, which is result of inflammation of the soft tissues surrounding the crown of a partially erupted tooth, most commonly the second or third molar.

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°omicsonline.org
°JBR Journal of Interdisciplinary Medicine and Dental Science
°Mine Simsek / Esma Yildiz and Mutar Hamdi Aras